Mondelez International has been granted a patent for a method to improve the texture and flavor of bran and germ in whole wheat flour and baked goods. The method involves treating the bran and germ with water and an enzyme composition to convert insoluble fiber into soluble fiber and sugars, reducing grittiness and whole wheat flavor. The treatment can be done during tempering or after grinding the wheat berries. GlobalData’s report on Mondelez International gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

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According to GlobalData’s company profile on Mondelez International, Filled confectionary manufacturing was a key innovation area identified from patents. Mondelez International's grant share as of September 2023 was 56%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Patent granted for improving texture and flavor of whole wheat flour

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: Mondelez International Inc

A recently granted patent (Publication Number: US11766047B2) describes a method for treating bran and germ to produce whole wheat flour and baked goods with improved texture and flavor. The method involves hydrating the bran and germ with water and an enzyme composition containing xylanase and/or pentosanase. This enzymatic treatment converts the insoluble fiber of the bran and germ into soluble fiber and sugars, reducing grittiness and the strong whole wheat flavor.

The patent claims specify various aspects of the method. The treatment process includes hydrating a ground bran and germ fraction with water and the enzyme composition at a temperature below 80°C. The enzyme composition does not contain amylases or proteases. The xylanase and/or pentosanase used in the treatment are derived from Trichoderma reesei. The enzymatic treatment reduces the water retention capacity of the bran and germ to less than 80% and the water retention capacity of the whole wheat flour to less than 75%. The enzymatic treatment also avoids substantial gelatinization of starch in the bran and germ.

The patent also covers the resulting products obtained from the method. These include a ground bran and germ fraction or baked goods, such as crackers, biscuits, or cookies, which are made using the enzymatically treated bran and germ. Additionally, the patent describes a method of producing whole wheat flour and baked goods by combining the enzymatically treated bran and germ with an endosperm fraction to obtain a whole wheat flour. The resulting whole wheat flour and baked goods have reduced water retention capacity, enhancing their texture and quality.

Overall, this patent presents a method for improving the quality of whole wheat flour and baked goods by treating bran and germ with water and specific enzymes. The method reduces grittiness, the strong whole wheat flavor, and water retention capacity while increasing the content of soluble fiber and sugars. The resulting products have improved texture and can be used in various baked goods, such as crackers, biscuits, and cookies.

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GlobalData, the leading provider of industry intelligence, provided the underlying data, research, and analysis used to produce this article.

GlobalData Patent Analytics tracks bibliographic data, legal events data, point in time patent ownerships, and backward and forward citations from global patenting offices. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.