Coca-Cola has been accused of mis-leading consumers with its labelling, which it denies

Coca-Cola has been accused of mis-leading consumers with its labelling, which it denies

The US Supreme Court has agreed to review a case involving a long-running dispute between juice maker POM Wonderful and the Coca-Cola Company. 

The case, which dates back to 2008, has seen POM accuse Coca-Cola of allegedly misleading consumers over a pomegranate blueberry juice launched under its Minute Maid label. POM claims the brand is deceptive with its labelling as it contains only “trivial amounts” of pomegranate and blueberry juice. 

In May 2012, San Francisco's 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's ruling that found in favour of Coca-Cola. 

However, the Supreme Court this week agreed to review that decision. 

In a statement to just-drinks today (13 January), POM said it “pleased that the Supreme Court today agreed to review the 9th Circuit’s decision that a food producer is immune from suits for false statements on its product label”. 

Coca-Cola said in a statement: “We are confident our labeling fully complies with applicable FDA (Food & Drug Administration) regulations, as the lower courts have consistently found. The Court of Appeals issued a well-reasoned decision rejecting Pom's claims as meritless, and we look forward to the Supreme Court's careful review of that decision.”

The case will be argued in April and a decision is expected in June.