PepsiCo said that it clearly labels the ingredients it uses in Naked Juice products

PepsiCo said that it clearly labels the ingredients it uses in Naked Juice products

PepsiCo has attacked a lawsuit alleging its Naked Juice range misleads consumers over the type of fruit and vegetables the product contains.

In a lawsuit filed last week, health lobby group the Centre for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) claimed that PepsiCo implies its Naked Juice range contains "high-value ingredients" such as kale and blueberries. However, most of the product is made from "cheap, nutrient-poor apple juice", CSPI said.

"Consumers are paying higher prices for the healthful and expensive ingredients advertised on Naked labels, such as berries, cherries, kale and other greens, and mango," said CSPI litigation director Maia Kats. "But, consumers are predominantly getting apple juice, or in the case of Kale Blazer, orange and apple juice. They're not getting what they paid for."

The company has called the allegations "baseless", however, and said Naked Juice "clearly identifies" its ingredients. "There is nothing misleading about our Naked Juice products," PepsiCo said.

The CSPI also said PepsiCo's advertising campaigns for Naked Juice's Kale Blazer line "exaggerate the presence of kale". In response, PepsiCo said: "The label on our Kale Blazer juice accurately indicates each bottle contains five and three-quarter kale leaves."

The company also denied allegations that it is misleading consumers over Naked Juice's sugar content. "All products in the Naked portfolio proudly use fruits and/or vegetables with no sugar added," it said.

Last year, The Coca-Cola Co was forced to change labelling on its Vitaminwater range in the US as part of a court settlement with CSPI.