Molson Coors is launching outdoor activations for Rekorderlig across the UK

Molson Coors is launching outdoor activations for Rekorderlig across the UK

Molson Coors is the latest alcohol company to tap into Scandinavian lifestyle trends with a Rekorderlig campaign highlighting the benefits of "lagom".

The company, which owns the UK licence for Rekorderlig, said today it will hold a number of outdoor events across the country in support of the Swedish cider brand. The events will focus on the theory of lagom - that 'just enough' is the perfect amount of anything.

Molson Coors will run four different activations. City centre sites, including London, Birmingham, Portsmouth, Brighton, Canterbury, Cardiff and Manchester, will feature a #StartTheSwedishWay Rekorderlig Swedish-style holiday hut van, whilst a branded trike will target a host of Tesco supermarkets and visit bars and pubs. Rekorderlig brand ambassadors will also be visiting offices to deliver gift boxes, including fruit and ice to make summer drinks for staff.

"Using a typically Swedish fusion of high-end design and modesty, we want to show people first hand that we're refreshingly different and a brand you can rely on and trust," said Rekorderlig brand manager Sophie Erskine.

The campaign follows others in the UK that hooked on to Scandinavian concepts of living. In April, Carlsberg launched a series of TV adverts starring actor Mads Mikkelsen celebrating the "Danish Way". The ads asked "Why are Danes so happy" and talked about "hygge", the Danish word for feeling warm and cosy.

Molson Coors bought the distribution, sales and marketing rights of Swedish cider brand Rekorderlig in the UK and Ireland from Chilli Marketing in July 2015. The cider brand, which is produced in Vimmerby, Sweden, continues to be owned by AB Abro Bryggeri.

Expert analysis

United Kingdom Cider Market Insights Report 2016

United Kingdom Cider Market Insights Report 2016

The UK cider market declined in 2015, with cool damp summer conditions contrasting with the previous year, where there was growth for the industry. Sales were also hit by the lack of a global sporting...read more