just-drinks authors and correspondents

Ben Cooper

Ben CooperBiography

Ben Cooper is just-drinks' sustainable business editor and specialises in business ethics, corporate social responsibility, policy issues and sustainability. He holds MAs from Cambridge University and the University of London, respectively in Social and Political Sciences and Social Policy.

He joined the just-drinks editorial team in 2000 and today works across both just-drinks and just-food, while also writing occasionally for just-style.

In addition to his regular features, Ben has written numerous in-depth management briefings on issues such as alcohol policy, sponsorship, the Fairtrade market, the use of food colourings and environmental issues facing the clothing industry. He also writes regularly for Ethical Corporation magazine which specialises in the corporate social responsibility field.

He lives in London where he also works as a professional singer.

Columns by Ben Cooper

Sustainability in DrinksSustainability in Drinks

Every month, Ben Cooper casts his eye over sustainability efforts in the global drinks industry.

Articles by Ben Cooper

Consumer concerns about plastic packaging mean the issue is getting plenty of attention from politiciansHow important is the plastic crisis? More important than Brexit - Sustainability Spotlight 20 February 2019

Public policy and corporate action in relation to plastic packaging were always likely to remain much-discussed topics in 2019. Less than two months into the year, this is proving to be the case. Ben Cooper reports.


If it were possible, climate change will be an even bigger issue this year than 2018What will be the biggest sustainability trends in 2019? - Sustainability Spotlight 1 February 2019

Already the most significant long-term trend affecting drinks companies, climate change will top the 2019 agenda with an acceleration in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions urgently needed. Agricultural supply chains will be a prime focus as companies come under pressure to reduce their indirect 'Scope 3' emissions. Ben Cooper investigates.


Climate issues are highly prevalent in a chart of global risks for 2019What are the biggest global risks facing drinks companies in 2019? - Sustainability Spotlight 23 January 2019

The publication of the World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Risks Report 2019 last week showed environmental issues again dominating the long-term global risk landscape. For drinks companies, however, their significant exposure to climate-related risk only tells part of the story, with their supply chains particularly threatened by a combination of risk factors. Ben Cooper reports.


The soft drinks & bottled water categories felt the heat from their use of plastic in 2018The soft drinks & bottled water categories in 2018 - just-drinks' Review of the Year, Part II - FREE TO ACCESS 17 December 2018

The past year has seen significant change in the soft drinks and water sectors, precipitated by that immutable force - necessity. A look back over the past 12 months reveals how environmental and health concerns are shaping company strategy, investment decisions and new product development.


The soft drinks category is viewed by consumers as the biggest plastic waste culprit Why the soft drinks category is trapped in a plastic corner - Sustainability Spotlight 29 November 2018

Faced with relentless campaigning and mounting public concern about plastic pollution, soft drinks companies have no choice but to act to mitigate the environmental impact of their packaging. As new research is published underlining the increasing importance of sustainable packaging to consumers, Ben Cooper assesses the soft drinks sector's engagement with a recently-launched global initiative on plastic use.


The sugar tax took effect in the UK in AprilSugar - Which works best? Doing it yourself or being told what to do? - Sustainability Spotlight 13 July 2018

This year saw the launch of the first non-stop passenger service from Australia to the UK, reducing a journey that once took 42 days to a little over 17 hours. Soft drinks companies Down Under may be glad Australia's lawmakers appear so far to have resisted the chance of a quick trip back to the land of their forebears. Had they done so they might have heard their UK government counterparts waxing lyrical about the Soft Drinks Industry Levy (SDIL) on full-sugar soft drinks.


They may not look it, but research suggests Millennial consumers are less happy than previous generationsThe Millennials are taking over. But, why are they so miserable? – Consumer Trends 25 June 2018

This year sees the last of the Millennial cohort reach adulthood. The economic prospects for the generation differ widely between mature and emerging markets, Ben Cooper writes, but the world over they punch above their weight in terms of their influence and the interest they receive from brands.


Anheuser-Busch InBev unveiled the renewable symbol for Budweiser in JanuaryWhy consumers don't yet know about your sustainability efforts - Sustainability Spotlight 30 May 2018

A recently-published study suggests consumers may not be as drawn to Anheuser-Busch InBev's new 100% renewable electricity icon as the brewer might hope for. But, Ben Cooper writes, there are factors other than consumer sentiment driving the beverage sector's investment in renewable energy.


Why the drinks industry is falling behind food on sustainability matters - Sustainability Spotlight 14 May 2018

A new report from US-based sustainability non-profit Ceres, which assesses the performance of 613 US-based publicly-traded corporations on a comprehensive range of sustainability criteria, reveals food and drinks to be among the most progressive and highest-achieving sectors. However, the research does not reflect well on the drinks sector specifically.


Consumers have grown more wary of social media marketing since the Cambridge Analytica scandal brokeHow to collect data without alienating your consumer - Consumer Trends 1 May 2018

The Cambridge Analytica/Facebook data scandal may have been played out largely in the political arena but the implications for branded companies are arguably as serious as they are for politicians. Ben Cooper investigates.




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