Blog: Chris Brook-CarterMass drinking

Chris Brook-Carter | 24 February 2004

Pity the poor churchgoers of New Zealand, the latest and most unlikely victims of tightening alcohol policy. A binge drinkers’ tax in the country has resulted in priests being forced to switch to a low-alcohol wine in church services. The so-called “sherry tax” was imposed last year, putting all drinks containing between 14% and 23% alcohol on the same tax rate as full-strength spirits.

Mission Estate vineyard, which supplies up to 1,500 cases of altar wine each year to churches of different denominations, has therefore knocked the alcohol content down by 4% to escape the tax and keep the product affordable to churches.

By reducing the alcohol content, however, the wine does not keep for as long as before, giving the religious community a new headache altogether.

“You can't use the new altar wine in some places because it would go off before you finished the bottle,” said Catholic priest Paddy Kinsella. “We still use the older wine at small churches where we don't say mass very often as we want wine that will last 30 weeks.”


BLOG

Drinking & Driving? Ford and Jose Cuervo's Tequila cars

A couple of months ago, US-based Saltwater Brewery developed 'edible six-pack rings' in an effort to curb threats to wildlife....

BLOG

I'll drink what I want, Stoli, but make it easy, yeah?

Last month, SPI Group unveiled its latest advert for Stolichnaya in the US. Its an amusing little number that caries the instruction: Drink what you want. The “I am man” ad looks to distance Millennia...

BLOG

Your company's homepage on just-drinks

Who do you work for? I ask, merely to draw your attention to just-drinks’ company pages....

BLOG

Caipirinha Facts!

This weekend sees yet another “International Day” for a drinks category. Lucky us. Anyway, ahead of Sunday’s International Cachaça Day, here’s a wealth of information on Brazil’s national spirit, cour...

just-drinks homepage



Forgot your password?