“A price increase may be an effective policy mechanism to decrease sales of regular soda,” researchers noted

“A price increase may be an effective policy mechanism to decrease sales of regular soda,” researchers noted

An increase in the price of full-sugar soft drinks in the US may be an effective way of reducing consumption, according to research from Harvard Medical School.

An investigation, carried out by the university’s Department of Population Medicine, looked at whether a price increase on regular-sugared soft drinks and educational intervention would reduce sales.

Researchers said in the report, published late last week, that a five-phase programme was implemented at the Brigham and Women's Hospital cafeteria in Boston, Massachusetts. After posting existing prices of regular and diet soft drinks and water, a price increase of 35% on regular soft drinks and an educational campaign were put into place.

Researchers also collected data from a comparison site, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, also in Boston.

As a result, the report noted that sales of regular soft drinks declined by 26% during the price increase phase. However, education had no effect on sales.

“A price increase may be an effective policy mechanism to decrease sales of regular soda,” researchers noted. “Further multi-site studies in varied populations are warranted to confirm these results.”

Click here to view the report.