For full details of the research cited in this report, click here

Spirits consumers in the UK are becoming disillusioned with the usual range of spirits and are looking for products that emphasise creativity, according to recent research.

A report from Canadean earlier this month has found that consumers looking for fun and enjoyable spirits account for almost 10% of total spirits volumes in the UK, with this desire resgistering strongest among 25- to 34-year-olds. Home-mixology is growing in popularity, which allows consumers to combine unusual flavours to create their own recipe.

The trend is helping drive the growth of brands such as Diageo's RTS cocktail brand, Parrot Bay, the report notes.

According to Ronan Stafford, senior analyst at Canadean: “Making new cocktails and mixes will remain a favourite activity of consumers. Many will still keep a close eye on their budgets, limiting how often they go to clubs and bars and preferring parties at home. Brands should help consumers experiment with new, fun mixes and flavours at home.”

‘Creating’ their own flavour mix gives consumers the opportunity to show off, especially if the drink proves to be popular with others. Social media is one of the channels through which they can flaunt images of their new concoctions. “This creates excitement and a buzz on social media amongst others who are intrigued as to how the products tastes,” Stafford added.

While the desire for novelty and experimentation is rife, this usually comes at a cost premium. Not all consumers are able to afford this luxury, and are instead looking towards budget or private-label products that they can enjoy at home. Value for money is important to target home consumption, with smaller and cheaper packs needed to target a greater number of experimental consumers.

Overall, while making new cocktails and mixes will remain a favourite activity of consumers, many will still keep a close eye on their budgets. Brands could help consumers experiment with new fun mixes and flavours at home with small 'mixing' packs that help keep prices low.

For full details of the research cited in this report, click here