The soft drinks sector is coming under increasing pressure from legislators in the US

The soft drinks sector is coming under increasing pressure from legislators in the US

A trade group has spoken out after plans to force soft drinks firms to put warning labels on “sugary” drinks sold in California were tabled by a state senator. 

Bill Monning, a Democrat in the California State Senate, put forward proposed legislation today (13 February) calling for all beverages with 75 or more calories per 12 ounces to be labelled with a warning. It is the first proposed legislation of its kind in the US, according to Monning. 

The warning on labels would read: “State of California safety warning: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay.” 

Monning argues that the science is “conclusive” that links soda and sugary drink consumption to rising rates of obesity, diabetes and tooth decay in the US. 

However, in a statement to just-drinks CalBev, which represents soft drinks producers in California, disputed this claim. “We agree that obesity  is a serious and complex issue,” it said. “However, it is misleading to suggest that soft drink consumption is uniquely responsible for weight gain.” 

The group claimed that only 4% of calories in the “average American diet” are directly derived from soda, while foods are the top source of sugar in US diets. 

The US soft drinks industry has so far been successful in stopping plans for a ban on the sales of large sugary beverages in New York City