High sugar drinks would have to carry warning labels if the bill was passed

High sugar drinks would have to carry warning labels if the bill was passed

A US state bill to force soft drinks producers to include warnings on their products over the potential health effects has provoked criticism from the industry after the measure passed its first hurdle. 

Senate Bill 1000, tabled by Democrat state senator Bill Monning, calls for packaging on sugary CSDs in California to warn consumers about obesity, diabetes and tooth decay. The bill was passed yesterday (9 April) by the state senate's health committee after a vote, Reuters reported

However, CalBev, the California arm of the American Beverage Association, branded the potential law a “red tape nightmare that would result in higher overhead costs, which would ultimately be passed on to consumers.” 

In a statement to just-drinks today, the group added: “The last thing California needs is a confusing labelling law that creates barries to opening news business, right as our economy is slowly starting to recover.” 

CalBev also attacked the proposals for being “confusing” as they contain exemptions for milk-based products, like frappuccinos. Some of these products contain as many calories as sodas, the group claimed. 

The next stage for the bill in California is the senate appropriations committee.

A law was passed in the state in 2005 that places restrictions on the food and drinks that can be sold in California's high schools