Coca-Cola Amatil has said it has no plans to take legal action against the Northern Territory Container Deposit Legislation scheme

Coca-Cola Amatil has said it has no plans to take legal action against the Northern Territory Container Deposit Legislation scheme

Coca-Cola Amatil has denied reports that it is planning legal action against the Northern Territory Container Deposit Legislation (CDL) scheme in Australia.

In January 2012, the Northern Territory Government is to introduce a AUD0.10 (US$0.10) refund for recycled containers to try to cut litter and encourage recycling. However, reports have suggested that Coca-Coca Amatil (CCA), Australia's leading soft drinks maker, is to challenge the law on the basis that there cannot be different rules in individual Australian states.

However, CCA denied that it plans to take such legal action against the scheme. "CCA is constructively engaged in meeting its obligations under the Northern Territory's CDL scheme and will meet the timetable for introduction in the Northern Territory in January 2012," CCA said in a statement today (20 September).

"In the meantime, CCA plays an active role in the recovery and recycling of beverage containers in Australia and we will continue with this commitment in the future."

However, CCA said that, on the issue of container deposits, it feels there are "better ways of achieving more recycling and reducing litter".

It added: "At Coca-Cola Amatil (CCA) our focus is on the full lifecycle of a package. We're leading the way in Australia by using less PET resin in the manufacture of our beverage bottles - this "lightweighting" process will save thousands of tonnes of PET resin every year.

"In 2011 we have invested $1.2m into public place recycling infrastructure, a contribution we're looking to extend," CCA said. "This will also include support for remote area recycling and litter programmes. We believe this is a more efficient and cost effective solution to away-from-home recycling than the Container Deposit Scheme, which will be very expensive and inefficient."

A number of environmental groups have called for Coca-Cola products to be boycotted because of the company's opposition to the Northern Territory deposit scheme.