The report suggested "binge-drinking" is an under-recognised problem among women

The report suggested "binge-drinking" is an under-recognised problem among women

A new report on “binge-drinking” among US women has been branded as “misleading” by a drinks trade body. 

The report from the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), released yesterday (8 January), claimed that around one in eight women and one in five high school girls in the country binge-drink. The CDC defines “binge-drinking” for women as consuming four or more alcoholic drinks in one session. 

The centre also argued that “binge-drinking” is not widely recognised as a health problem among women.

However, the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS) said in a statement that it was “inaccurate” for the CDC to describe the problem of binge-drinking as under-recognised.

It added: “It is also misleading for CDC to ignore its own data, which shows that binge-drinking among girls has declined by 25% over the last decade to historic lows.”

The group added that the spirits industry is “committed to working to further reduce binge drinking through its programmes such as The Century Council’s 'Girl Talk'."

In November, DISCUS appointed a former top government scientist to head its scientific affairs office.