AUSTRALIA: A bottle of VB goes a long way-23,000km to be exact!

By just-drinks.com editorial team | 10 July 2000

After nearly 16-months, a stubby of Australia's top selling beer, VB (Victoria Bitter), has completed a sea current-powered voyage of more than 23,000km from a beach at Geelong, near Melbourne, to another beach, at Gwynedd in Wales.The 375ml stubby, containing a letter identifying the three girls who sent it, was dropped into the sea on March 6 last year.It was found at Rhosneigr Beach, in Angelsey, on June 29 by Ray Goodwin, of Oldham, Lancashire, who sent the girls a postcard saying he'd found it.Dr Graham Symonds, oceanographer at the Australian Defence Force Academy's School of Geography and Oceanography, said the stubby probably drifted into the east-flowing Antarctic circumpolar current south of Australia and then was carried past Cape Horn, then north through the Atlantic Oceans to the Irish Sea."It would have had an average speed of 0.5 metres a second, which is possible in major ocean current systems," he said.The stubby came from a carton shared by appropriately named Rod Beer, father of one of the girls, Alexa, and his friend Simon Brearley, father of the other girls, Amanda and Claire.The families were staying at a caravan park and when Mr Goodwin replied he said he had found the bottle while holidaying at his caravan.

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After nearly 16-months, a stubby of Australia's top selling beer, VB (Victoria Bitter), has completed a sea current-powered voyage of more than 23,000km from a beach at Geelong, near Melbourne, to another beach, at Gwynedd in Wales.The 375ml stubby, containing a letter identifying the three girls who sent it, was dropped into the sea on March 6 last year.It was found at Rhosneigr Beach, in Angelsey, on June 29 by Ray Goodwin, of Oldham, Lancashire, who sent the girls a postcard saying he'd found it.Dr Graham Symonds, oceanographer at the Australian Defence Force Academy's School of Geography and Oceanography, said the stubby probably drifted into the east-flowing Antarctic circumpolar current south of Australia and then was carried past Cape Horn, then north through the Atlantic Oceans to the Irish Sea."It would have had an average speed of 0.5 metres a second, which is possible in major ocean current systems," he said.The stubby came from a carton shared by appropriately named Rod Beer, father of one of the girls, Alexa, and his friend Simon Brearley, father of the other girls, Amanda and Claire.The families were staying at a caravan park and when Mr Goodwin replied he said he had found the bottle while holidaying at his caravan.

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