Italy leads the way globally in imported beer consumption

Italy leads the way globally in imported beer consumption

How loyal are beer drinkers to domestic brews? The latest annual British Beer & Pub Association statistical handbook, published this month, reveals some interesting figures on which countries consume the most imported beer. Here are a few highlights.

  • Globally, Italy leads the way, with 36.4% of total beer drunk coming from abroad. This figure has been steadily rising in the Noughties. In 1970, just 4.9% of beer drunk by Italians came from foreign shores.
  • France, traditonally a wine drinking country, comes next, as around a third (33.2%) of beers supped are imports. Again, this has been a marked shift from 1970, when the figure was just 5.6%.
  • Elsewhere in Europe, Hungary has witnessed the trend reverse. In 1970 nearly a fifth (18.6%) of beer drunk by Hungarians was imported. In 2010, that figure is a mere 1.6%.
  • Australians, meanwhile, have remained relatively committed to the offerings of domestic brewers. While the amount of imported beer drunk has risen from 0.1% in 1980, the figure is still at a relatively modest 9% as of 2010.
  • US beer drinkers are a loyal bunch too, with imported brews only making a modest dent. Around 12.5% of beer consumed is foreign, according to the latest figures, compared to 2.5% in 1980.
  • Canadians have developed more of a taste for imported brews. Foreign beers made up around a fifth (21.2%) of consumption in 2010, compared to 2.9% in 1980.
  • For the regions of South and Central America, Asia and Africa, the figures for imported consumption remain in low single-digit percentages. Only South Africa, where imports represented 5.4% of consumption in 2010, up from 1.5% in 2000, reveals any notable trend.